Posts Tagged ‘Speeds and Feeds’

Knowing the hardness of the material you are machining is important.  It helps determine the appropriate speeds and feeds for your application and can affect the design of the tool being used in the machining process.  Despite this importance, it is surprising, although very common, that many machinists do not know the hardness of the […]

Share

  Steel is a hard material to drill.  The same characteristics that make steel enticing to use in products are the same characteristics that make it difficult to machine and drill.  There are cutting tools that can drill steel.  Selecting the proper drill to use depends heavily on the properties of the steel such as […]

Share

Reaming Blind Holes vs. Reaming Through Holes Knowing the difference between the two types of holes is important when reaming with coolant.  A blind hole is a hole that does not have an opening on the other end.  If you were to put your eye up to the hole, all you would see is darkness.  […]

Share

Today we are going to focus specifically on reamers. Reamers are used to produce accurate sized holes with surface finishes that are typically smoother than drilling or boring. A typical reaming job involves drilling or boring the hole to be sized leaving two – three percent of the finish diameter for reaming.  So, a 0.5000” […]

Share

Drilling Speeds and Feeds Last week we talked about speeds and feeds in general.  Today we are going to focus specifically on drills.  Drills are one of the hardest working cutting tools. They remove more material relative to their size then any other cutting tool.  A reamer typically removes 2%-3% of its diameter; a core […]

Share

Introduction to Speeds and Feeds

Posted: 14th February 2012 by brednane1981 in Speeds and Feeds
Tags: ,

Cutting Tool Speeds and Feeds In machining, “speeds and feeds” refers to the speed at which the tool is turning (usually measured in RPMs), and the rate (the feed) that the tool is being fed into the material being machined.  Speeds and feeds are important.  When optimized there is a greater chance of achieving the […]

Share