Posts Tagged ‘Reamers’

 Expansion Reamers: Precision holes require precision tools. When machinists need an exact size hole, they want the best tool available to achieve the desired diameter. That’s a job for a reamer. The appropriate amount of stock removal for carbide tipped reamers is typically 2-3 percent of the finished hole size.  This is so the reamer […]

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I’m a bowler. I’ve been bowling in leagues for about 9 years now, and while, I have yet to bowl a perfect game (although I have come pretty close) or pick up that unforgiving 7-10 split (I have never come close at all), I have had my own custom ball since I’ve started. As with […]

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Knowing the hardness of the material you are machining is important.  It helps determine the appropriate speeds and feeds for your application and can affect the design of the tool being used in the machining process.  Despite this importance, it is surprising, although very common, that many machinists do not know the hardness of the […]

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      Coatings can be a bit overwhelming. Here are some things to consider when choosing whether or not to have your tools coated and which type of coatings to choose. The Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) Process When coating tools, Super Tool uses the Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) process because it allows for more […]

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The majority of requests I receive for special tools ends with something along the lines of “…and I need them tomorrow.”  This is frequently possible if semi-finished tools can be used to make the tool the customer is asking for.  If the tool has to be made from scratch, forget it.  Best case scenario would […]

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Reaming Blind Holes vs. Reaming Through Holes Knowing the difference between the two types of holes is important when reaming with coolant.  A blind hole is a hole that does not have an opening on the other end.  If you were to put your eye up to the hole, all you would see is darkness.  […]

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Today we are going to focus specifically on reamers. Reamers are used to produce accurate sized holes with surface finishes that are typically smoother than drilling or boring. A typical reaming job involves drilling or boring the hole to be sized leaving two – three percent of the finish diameter for reaming.  So, a 0.5000” […]

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